Tag Archives: Canada

Off Grid Living – Converting a Shed in an Off Grid Home

Off Grid Living – Converting a Shed into an Off Grid Home in the United States

Off Grid Living - Converting a Shed in an Off Grid Home

Off Grid Living – Converting a Shed in an Off Grid Home

See more => https://livingoffgrid.home.blog

Searching for design ideas on how to convert a shed into a home for an off grid property? Click here to watch this video with numerous shed cabin design ideas to help you start to sketching out on paper the kind of log cabin you would like to build on your off grid property or rural piece of property.

Learn more from our Guide to Off Grid Living located at: https://livingoffgrid.home.blog/guide-to-off-grid-living/

United States – Welcome to the Living Off Grid’s free “Guide of Off Grid Living,” which provide links to tutorials, photos and videos on how to move from an on-grid home connected to basic utilities like electric, gas, water and sewer utilities to an off grid household that utilizes solar power, rainwater harvesting, aquaponic gardens, and raising your own backyard livestock including chickens, ducks, rabbits and other livestock as well as planting wildlife food plots to attract deer, elk, turkeys, quail, dove, pheasants and other wild game that can be hunted legally.

Whether your family lives inside the city limits or in a rural area far from the neon lights of a large metropolitan area, the purpose of this “Guide to Off Grid Living” is to educate anyone that wants to learn how to move their family and household into a self-sustainable lifestyle that supports a full-circle of life so that if “Shit Hits the Fan” and/or there is a national emergency and we lose all electrical power – you will be prepared to live without any connections to local city utility services regardless of where you are located.

Our “Guide to Off Grid Living” nearly 100 in-depth chapters that cover everything you need to Google, research, plan, build and manage an off grid property complete with thousands of photos, video tutorials and research articles that you can utilize to educate yourself and begin your own path of personal exploration to see where you would like to begin and what ultimate goals and objectives you will need to establish your own Off Grid Living Home.

#offgrid #living #livingoffgrid #offgridliving #shed #cabin #home #arizona #california #newmexico #newyork #texas

Off Grid Living - Prepping to Live Off the Grid

Guide to Off Grid Living Launches New https://livingoffgrid.home.blog/ Website to Complement Its Facebook Discussion Groups and Business Pages

The Facebook pages/groups and the off grid website provide info on building off grid homes, producing solar power, growing organic gardens, raising livestock and harvesting rainwater in Arizona, California, New Mexico, New York and Texas

Please Follow and Like our Off Grid Living Facebook Arizona Group Page

SACRAMENTO, California – The Guide to Off Grid Living announced today that it has launched a new website to educate people that want to buy a rural piece of property and build an off-grid homestead in Arizona, California, New Mexico, New York or Texas.

“Today’s world is full of high-technology gadgets, computers, cell phones, cloud-based services that are all dependent on electricity, but as more than 2 million people found out in California, that can change instantly overnight and without warning,” said Robert Hoskins, Editor, Guide to Off Grid Living. “Our living off grid guide is written specifically to help beginners learn how to survive as long as the sun is shining and the clouds are raining.”

“Even if you live in a suburban or a downtown urban environment, almost anyone can prepare themselves and their family to live in a world without water, gas or electricity from local utility companies, which might vanish overnight, whether it be just for a couple of days or many months at a time,” Hoskins continued. “On the plus side, imagine what it would be like to live in a home with zero utility or grocery bills.”

The site is located at Living-Off-Grid.com and covers a wide variety of off the grid subject matters, how-to articles, video tutorials and guides for beginners, which provide top tips, tricks and strategies for off grid living and homesteading.

Building an Off Grid Shelter

For shelter, the site provides insightful information that beginners can use to research, plan and build their first off grid home, cabin, shed, tiny home, container house, earthship, steel building, terraced homes, yurts, glamping tents, Indian Tipi, underground bunker or wilderness shelters.

Living Off Grid - How to Turn a Shed into an Off Grid Cabin or Home

Living Off Grid – How to Turn a Shed into an Off Grid Cabin or Home

Installing an Off Grid Renewable Energy Power Source

For energy, the site details how to harness solar, wind and hydro energy to produce solar electricity, solar hot water, passive solar window furnacesolar lighting systems and solar ovens for cooking as well as the best backup generators.

Guide to Off Grid Living - How to Select between Mono-Crystalline vs Polycrystalline Solar Panels

Guide to Off Grid Living – How to Select between Mono-Crystalline vs Polycrystalline Solar Panels

Planting an Off Grid Garden and Raising Livestock

For food, the site details how to plant organic raised-bed gardens to grow vegetables, grain, medicinal herbs; how to build aquaponic gardens/fish farms; and how to raise chickens, ducks, rabbits, goats, bees and other live stock to put food on the table.

Off Grid Living - How to Build a Predator Proof Chicken Coop to Protect Against Foxes, Skunks, Opossums and Raccoons

Off Grid Living – How to Build a Predator Proof Chicken Coop to Protect Against Foxes, Skunks, Opossums and Raccoons

Providing an Off Grid Source for Fresh Water

For water, the site details how to collect water utilizing rainwater harvesting systems using rooftops and collection barrels/cisterns; how to build fresh water ponds for raising fish/aquatic plants; and how to drill your own well if the water table is close to the surface.

Off Grid Living - How to Install Rain Barrel Cisterns to Collect Rainwater and Store It to Provide Water

Off Grid Living – How to Install Rain Barrel Cisterns to Collect Rainwater and Store It to Provide Water

Providing an Heat Source for an Off Grid Home, Cabin or Shed

For heating, the site details how to select wood stoves, micro stoves, stove top blowers, small rocket stoves or large rocket mass heater/masonry stoves and tutorials on selecting the best chainsaws and how to build a firewood shed to keep wood dry.

Living Off Grid - Using an Efficient Wood Stove to Heat an Off Grid Shed, Cabin or Home

Living Off Grid – Using an Efficient Wood Stove to Heat an Off Grid Shed, Cabin or Home

The Best States to Start Living Off the Grid

In addition to its first five business pages on Facebook, https://livingoffgrid.home.blog/   provides information for beginners that want to learn more about what it takes to live off the grid in Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, West Virginia, Wyoming or anywhere in the United States.

Off Grid Living - How to Buy Raw Land Parcels for an Off Grid Homestead

Off Grid Living – How to Buy Raw Land Parcels for an Off Grid Homestead

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How to Build a Rocket Mass Heater to Heat the Crawl Space of Your Off Grid Home, Cabin or Shed

Heating the Crawl Space of Your Home, Cabin or Shed with a Rocket Mass Heater to Keep Your Home Warm During the Coldest Polar Vortex

What is a rocket mass heater?

A rocket mass heater a hyper efficient wood stove that uses far less wood to get a far more effective result, whether it’s heating or cooking. It grew out of efforts in developing countries to build a more fuel efficient, safer cooking stove and it has since morphed into an idea that could eventually replace your furnace.

When building your first off grid cabin, one of the chief concerns is what is the best to heat it. Most people rely entirely on wood fuel. A regular wood burning stove will make a big dent in the precious wood pile. But not with a rocket mass heater. For those who haven’t encountered one before, the rocket mass heater (RMH) is a well proven though not widely used way to burn wood very efficiently, and then capture all the heat produced, in a mass – normally a bench or bed – by passing the flue horizontally through it. (see below)

Off Grid Living - How to Build a Rocket Mass Heater to Heat a Home or Cabin

Off Grid Living – How to Build a Rocket Mass Heater to Heat a Home or Cabin

First it burns small fuel, which we typically don’t use in our range cooker. Secondly, it burns very efficiently and thus cleanly, so less fuel is required. Most people are  a little skeptical about the claims made for RMHs, especially the cleanliness of the exhaust and the temperatures that could be reached inside the burner, but they are indeed very true.

Most will require a 20ft horizontal flue, heat retaining bench that snakes its way around the crawl space underneath the cabin and a 50 gallon steel drum needs to be designed as part of a building as outlined in the diagram above.  It would be smart to build this at the same time your build your home or cabin.

Read more => https://www.permaculture.co.uk/readers-solutions/build-your-own-rocket-mass-heater

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Click here to like and follow our Off Grid Living Group on Facebook! 

How to Setup an Easy Rainwater Harvesting for Off Grid Homes

Setting Up an Easy to Build Rainwater Harvesting System with a Tin Roof, Rain Gutters, Screens, Chlorine Tablets, Storage Tanks and an Activated Carbon Filter to Ensure Safe, Clean Drinking Water

By Markerbuoy – On Canada’s Left Coast

Canada – Almost twenty years ago, I set up this rainwater collection system out in the woods. Using about three hundred square feet of metal roofing to catch the rainwater, the water is run through a very coarse filter as it exits the gutter.

Before flowing in to the 2,000 gallon storage tank, the water passes through a much finer filter and is chlorinated at the same time, using a slow dissolving chlorine puck normally used in pools and spas.

Thus the collected water is cleansed of debris and other nasty stuff before it enters the storage tank. This, I think is key to successful acquisition and storage of rainwater. If the water is not clean before entering storage you are making extra work for yourself “downstream”, assuming you intend to drink it. I have never had to clean the inside of the tank (which can be a dangerous job) or been afraid to drink the water after final treatment and filtration.

Of note, is the fact that the tank is pigmented (green in this case), which helps prevent sunlight activating growth of any kind in the precious water. White or clear tanks are not so great for blocking the harmful effects of sunlight. During warm weather I monitor the chlorine content of the stored water.

With regards to chlorination of water, ScientificAmerican.com states, “Chlorine effectively kills a large variety of microbial water-borne pathogens, including those that can cause typhoid fever, dysentery, cholera and Legionnaires’ disease. Chlorine is widely credited with virtually eliminating outbreaks of water-borne disease in the United States and other developed countries.”

In addition, Life Magazine recently cited the filtration of drinking water and use of chlorine as “Probably the most significant public health advance of the millennium.”

It only takes a cupful of household bleach to effectively “shock” the water free of most pathogens. I usually do this on departure from the cabin and the residual chlorine then has time to dissipate prior to our return. In case there is any residual chlorine in the supply, I again filter the water before use, using an activated charcoal cartridge in my Rainfresh household water filter.

The result is a reliable source of fresh clean drinking water that literally falls out of the sky! No need to drill a well or construct unnecessarily complicated systems, electrical or otherwise.

The whole system runs on gravity; the storage tank is approximately 100′ higher than the cabin.

For every foot of elevation, water pressure below rises by .43 pounds per square inch, resulting in about 43 psi at the cabin level. The pressure is entirely sufficient to run the filtration system, a propane fired demand hot water heater and a hosepipe – all the water amenities of living in town.

Of course, with even a simple system such as this, some degree of maintenance is required. After all, you are running a small utility. Perhaps the biggest concern comes during the winter months, which in our part of the northern hemisphere can become freezing cold at times, potentially causing burst pipes, valves and filter bowls, if they are not properly drained in the fall.

In the woods, tree debris falls on the roof and despite best efforts, gutters always clog too quickly. Water filters have to be exchanged once in a while and attention has to be paid to chlorination. However, basic maintenance is a small price to pay for such a life sustaining benefit.

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